Intuition (original title La corazonada) is an Argentine thriller released in 2020, written and directed by Alejandro Montiel. It’s a prequel of Perdida, telling the story of the first two cases of Pipa as a detective.

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Hello, there! I’m dos Santos, and this is Ulven Reviews, with Movies and series from all over the world and all eras. Today we’ll talk about Intuition, beginning with a plot summary, through the review, and concluding with a symbolic rating.

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While still a police officer, Pipa (played by Luisana Lopilato), helps in the apprehension of a famous murderer. Her competence draws the attention of the infamous detective Francisco Juánez (played by Joaquín Furriel), who calls her to his team and becomes a mentor to her.

Their first case together is the high-profile murder of the 19-year-old rich girl Gloriana Márquez (played by Delfina Chaves). However, Pipa will have to covert-investigate her boss and mentor Juánez, suspect of killing the boy who accidentally killed his late wife.


Well, Intuition is a smooth and simple detective movie. It has its mysteries and revelations but nothing too fancy. It’s definitely less predictable than Perdida. I couldn’t figure everything out as soon as I did with Perdida.

In general, I liked Intuition more. In the beginning, I was getting really annoyed with Juánez’s demeanor, but as things were unfolding, it got better. In the end, I think it was a more enjoyable experience with a more mature movie than its predecessor.

Another thing that got better was the characters, especially Pipa. I really liked her in Intuition. She’s not a complete stereotype and actually dresses as a professional detective and not as a wanna-be-tough teenager.

She’s more believable as an individual. We can see her insecurities as a beginner and her growth while she figures out the job. I also liked how she has different roles in each one of her simultaneous investigations, one as an apprentice and the other as a proactive leader.

Her mentor, Juánez, was an ambiguous figure. Sometimes I liked him, and sometimes I didn’t, and I think he was designed this way on purpose, to keep a mystery in the plot.

The guy is an experienced and perceptive detective. He gives some nice insights about the cases and human nature in general throughout the whole movie. However, sometimes he’s the silent, mysterious type, and it’s really annoying. Also, there are moments in which he’s rude out of nowhere.

The detective related scenes drastically improved. In Intuition, we had a crime scene investigation, an instructive autopsy that didn’t feel forced, and some other tense moments that I’ll leave for you to see.

Cinematography and score kept around the same level as Perdida. The score was slightly inferior to the previous film. It didn’t have the uniqueness I pointed out in the last video, so it fell on the generic-thriller-score side this time.

Cinematography, on the other hand, was the star. Helped by some great locations (like the police precinct), the whole movie looked beautiful and very compelling, once again being one of my favorite things about the film.

The scenes have amazing lighting and colors, while the movements and angles of the camera were always really neat and professional, although not outstanding or special. And there was no disgustingly shaky camera, not even in the action scenes.


Intuition is an improvement to the previous movie, Perdida. It was a time well spent, yet far from remarkable, being a very standard detective story. I’ll give Intuition 6 Moons.

That’s it for now.

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